State laws mandating the use of seatbelts in cars

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Ideally, all infants and children in all vehicles should be covered by enforceable safety belt laws or child safety seat laws or both.

But differences in the way the laws in various states are worded result in many occupants, especially children, being covered by neither law.

They believe their son, whom they love dearly, is going to be tortured forever. They’re upset that I reject their way of life as both deluded was a Christian. And let’s say this information came from a very reliable source, so that you this was going to happen. Would you just mention this to your friends and family in passing, and send them the occasional tract with information on the threat of the Nazis? Maybe you would drive out there and try to convince them of the threat until you were blue in the face. I know if would do some pretty drastic things to save my friends and family.

Sure, they’re upset that their son has rejected most of the values and “truths” they tried to instill in me. The Nazis were going take everybody off to concentration camps in chains, and possibly kill them.

In April 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement recommending that children ride in rear-facing child safety seats until at least age 2.

Previously, the recommendation was rear-facing until at least age 1 and 20 pounds.

Police are prohibited in South Carolina from enforcing safety belt laws at checkpoints designed for that purpose.

In some states, the reduction may not exceed a fixed percentage of the damages.

All 50 states and the District of Columbia have child safety seat laws.

Safety belt use can have implications in civil suits — 16 states allow the "safety belt defense," which can reduce damages collected by someone in a crash if the person failed to buckle up.

The reduction is permitted only for injuries that would have been prevented by a belt.

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